Senior Pet Wellness Club

Wild cats live up to 8 years with an average lifespan of 5 years. Stray dogs live up to 10 years with an average lifespan of 8 years. Our loved pets live much longer, but in their advanced years may suffer from age-related conditions. In many cases we can treat these problems to make these “old” years “happy” years and keep them younger, longer! The sooner problems are diagnosed, the sooner treatment is started and the more we can help!

 

As pets age, they can become prone to developing certain types of diseases:

Regular checkups with your veterinarian will help detect any health problems early

The earlier these problems are identified the more can be done to help.
This is where Cambridge Vets and the “Senior Pet Wellness Club” can help.
We can provide a more pro-active approach to senior animal care through an individualised wellness programme for your pet.
Registration is free and you are always in control. You can decide on how involved you would like to be and how much you get out of it. As a member, you can enjoy several benefits including:

  • Regular newsletters
  • Special discounts on certain products and services
  • A healthcare plan specifically designed to keep your pet as healthy as possible.
  • Individualised check-ups, reminders and follow-ups.
  • Opportunity to enter competitions and win prizes.
  • Being kept informed with the latest developments with new products and veterinary care.

Remember, pets age about 7 times faster than humans, so a trip to the vet once a year for your pet is like a trip to the doctors every 7 years for us.

Providing optimal care for Senior Pets:

  • Intervention will be of more benefit if instituted early
  • Promotes early detection of abnormalities (even in the apparently normal pet)
  • Promotes individualised medical care to enhance quality & length of life
  • Acknowledges & enhances the human-animal bond

Facebook Posts

3 days ago

Cambridge Vets

Well it’s that time of the year again. 🌺
Late spring and early summer sees a variety of fledgling birds venturing out for the first time with mixed results. 🐣 Nurse Janine takes a minute to feed a pigeon baby while the starling baby watches.
We are fielding many questions from concerned people who are seeing baby birds in potential distress. There is a very helpful article on the SPCA website about when to rescue a baby bird and when not to. www.spca.nz/advice-and-welfare/article/what-to-do-if-you-find-an-injured-bird-or-fledgling
But a few of the helpful hints that I really liked were:
• If the baby bird is fully feathered, has no obvious injuries or blood and is in no immediate danger then just observe,
• If you have to pick the baby bird up, look for the nest or place on top of a hedge as this is more difficult for a cat to climb up on to,
• The parents will be close by and even if the baby can’t fly properly, it will call out and the parents will continue to feed it. It may take a week or so until its flight feathers come in fully and it makes its first proper flight.
• Any baby birds that are not fully feathered can be put back into the nest.
• Any ill or injured baby birds need to be kept warm and kept in the dark as this helps to keep them calm. Please ring the clinic for help or seek out a local rescue organisation to help you decide what to do next.
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Well it’s that time of the year again. 🌺  
Late spring and early summer sees a variety of fledgling birds venturing out for the first time with mixed results. 🐣  Nurse Janine takes a minute to feed a pigeon baby while the starling baby watches.   
We are fielding many questions from concerned people who are seeing baby birds in potential distress.  There is a very helpful article on the SPCA website about when to rescue a baby bird and when not to.  www.spca.nz/advice-and-welfare/article/what-to-do-if-you-find-an-injured-bird-or-fledgling
But a few of the helpful hints that I really liked were:
• If the baby bird is fully feathered, has no obvious injuries or blood and is in no immediate danger then just observe,  
• If you have to pick the baby bird up, look for the nest or place on top of a hedge as this is more difficult for a cat to climb up on to,
• The parents will be close by and even if the baby can’t fly properly, it will call out and the parents will continue to feed it.  It may take a week or so until its flight feathers come in fully and it makes its first proper flight.  
• Any baby birds that are not fully feathered can be put back into the nest.  
• Any ill or injured baby birds need to be kept warm and kept in the dark as this helps to keep them calm.  Please ring the clinic for help or seek out a local rescue organisation to help you decide what to do next.Image attachment

4 days ago

Cambridge Vets

Receive a FREE pack of Bee Blend Seed Bombs when you purchase a full pack of Advantage®, Advocate® or Seresto® for your cats or dogs. 🐱🐶🐾
While Stocks last.This is "Summer Flea Seed Bombs - Vet Clinics" by Elanco New Zealand on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.
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Video image

 

Comment on Facebook

1 week ago

Cambridge Vets

It's Friday Cuteness time again 🐾
Welcome to Friday with the cute face of little Trip.🐱
Trip was an injured stray that was handed into the clinic a few weeks ago. With no obvious owner, the treatment options for Trip were limited.

Dr Janine and Nurse Jess checked her over, pain medication was administered and x-rays were taken. 🩺 It was immediately apparent that Trip was suffering with a broken leg and a broken pelvis. A broken pelvis, whilst painful, is a condition that is managed with pain medication and will mend in time as long as the patient is kept still. This was the easy part, it was the second injury that caused the most worry.
The second injury Trip had suffered was a badly broken front leg. 🦴 Bones in the legs can be mended one of three ways.
The first method is to place the leg in a cast but where Trip’s break was meant that a cast was not an appropriate method of fixation.
The second method is to place a pin inside the bone to align the two broken ends of the bone to facilitate mending. But again, because the break was just above the joint, this was not going to provide enough stabilisation. The third method is to amputate the limb. This might sound a bit extreme for a young cat but we have found that they adapt very quickly to life as an amputee. Living life on three legs is no barrier to living life to the full! 😊
Nurse Jess was immediately taken with the friendly, plucky spirit of the youngster and decided to adopt her and Dr Janine performed the surgery. Two weeks later Trip is happily coping with life in a crate and gets a few minutes of free time twice daily to stretch her legs and Jess gets the chance to have special kitten cuddles Her pelvis is mending well, she is getting around better and her hair is growing back over her surgical site.
Only a few weeks ago, life was uncertain for this gorgeous wee girl, and now, once she is back to full throttle after her injuries heal, she will have to make the hard decisions facing all spoilt cats – which soft place will I sleep in today 😻
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Its Friday Cuteness time again 🐾
Welcome to Friday with the cute face of little Trip.🐱
Trip was an injured stray that was handed into the clinic a few weeks ago.   With no obvious owner, the treatment options for Trip were limited.   

Dr Janine and Nurse Jess checked her over, pain medication was administered and x-rays were taken. 🩺 It was immediately apparent that Trip was suffering with a broken leg and a broken pelvis.  A broken pelvis, whilst painful, is a condition that is managed with pain medication and will mend in time as long as the patient is kept still.  This was the easy part, it was the second injury that caused the most worry. 
The second injury Trip had suffered was a badly broken front leg. 🦴 Bones in the legs can be mended one of three ways.  
The first method is to place the leg in a cast but where Trip’s break was meant that a cast was not an appropriate method of fixation.  
The second method is to place a pin inside the bone to align the two broken ends of the bone to facilitate mending.  But again, because the break was just above the joint, this was not going to provide enough stabilisation.  The third method is to amputate the limb.  This might sound a bit extreme for a young cat but we have found that they adapt very quickly to life as an amputee.  Living life on three legs is no barrier to living life to the full!  😊
Nurse Jess was immediately taken with the friendly, plucky spirit of the youngster and decided to adopt her and Dr Janine performed the surgery.  Two weeks later Trip is happily coping with life in a crate and gets a few minutes of free time twice daily to stretch her legs and Jess gets the chance to have special kitten cuddles    Her pelvis is mending well, she is getting around better and her hair is growing back over her surgical site. 
Only a few weeks ago, life was uncertain for this gorgeous wee girl, and now, once she is back to full throttle after her injuries heal, she will have to make the hard decisions facing all spoilt cats – which soft place will I sleep in today 😻

 

Comment on Facebook

Yes you could have called her On That would be Spoton

Oh, she could’ve been a buddy for Spot!!

Aww shes beautiful. Good choice Jess😍

She's so pretty 😍

Go team

Pretty baby. 🤗

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2 weeks ago

Cambridge Vets

Update: This cat has now been reunited with her owner.
Thank you to everyone that shared. ☺️

FOUND - This cat has been brought into us today, was found in Leamington (Lamb Street). Please call the clinic 078277099.
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Update: This cat has now been reunited with her owner. 
Thank you to everyone that shared. ☺️ 

FOUND - This cat has been brought into us today, was found in Leamington (Lamb Street). Please call the clinic 078277099.

 

Comment on Facebook

Shared

Clare Vercoe

2 weeks ago

Cambridge Vets

Parker’s Post 🐶

How old am I now mum?
10months Parker!
Time sure has flown by, mum said I’m just about as tall as Dad!
What have I been up too these past few months? Well heaps that’s what! Mum said That I’m a true retriever and got the swimming bug and I’m going to be a pretty good strong swimmer 🏊♂️
When mum takes Dad and I down to the river with my best friend Tessa I just love to launch into the river and swim while Dad and Tessa run up and down the river side. Dad joins me sometimes but Tessa isn’t so sure. I think I can entice her in one day 🤔
Sometimes when I’m really lucky I’m allowed in the pool at home to practice my swimming styles. Man it’s sooo much fun and I love it lots.
Do you like to swim too?

Fun fact: Swimming is great for dogs as it is less impact on their joints, much like us, and great exercise for them too. It is good for older dogs or dogs recovering from surgery to have hydrotherapy.
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